Volume 10, Issue 1 (2021)                   JCP 2021, 10(1): 119-137 | Back to browse issues page

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Chelef M, Hemida H, Hassani A, Mazrou K, Mira S, Abdali M. Phytochemical profile of Atractylis gummifera rhizome, acute toxicity to Wistar rat and rat poisoning effect in the field. JCP. 2021; 10 (1) :119-137
URL: http://jcp.modares.ac.ir/article-3-43188-en.html
1- Laboratory of Agro-Biotechnology and Nutrition in Semi-Arid Zones, Faculty of Nature and Life Sciences, University of Tiaret, BP 78, 14000 Tiaret, Algeria. , mokhtaria.chelef@univ-tiaret.dz
2- Department of Biomedicine, Institute of Veterinary Sciences, University of Tiaret, Algeria.
3- Laboratory of Agro-Biotechnology and Nutrition in Semi-Arid Zones, Faculty of Nature and Life Sciences, University of Tiaret, BP 78, 14000 Tiaret, Algeria.
4- Laboratory of Hygiene and Animal Pathology, Institute of Veterinary Sciences, University of Tiaret, BP 78, 14000 Tiaret, Algeria.
Abstract:   (158 Views)
This study aimed to valorize Atractylis gummifera rhizome (AGR) from a phytochemical study aspect of the aqueous and methanolic extract to determine the total phenolic, flavonoids, and tannins compounds and to evaluate the rat poison effect of the powder (AGRP), methanolic (MEAGR) and aqueous extracts against Wistar rats under laboratory and Rattus norvegicus under field conditions in Tiaret, Algeria. The methanolic and aqueous extracts gave a yield of 9.4% and 20% respectively from AGR. The total polyphenols [mg gallic acid Eq/g dry matter (DM)], flavonoids (mg quercetin Eq /g DM), and tannins (mg catechin Eq/g DM) quantities were 27.14 ± 0.01, 17.73 ± 0.04, 9.71 ± 0.01, and 20.60 ± 0.01, 4.46 ± 0.46, 11.12 ± 0.02 in the methanolic and aqueous extract. The laboratory studies of toxicity showed that the three forms of plant rhizome have a poison effect against males and females of the Wistar rat with the highly toxic effect of AGRP. The results revealed a highly significant (< 0.01) increase in mortality with dose and time. Both LD50 and LD90 of the powder form were determined for males (471, 513 mg/kg/d) and females (471, 513 mg/kg/d) respectively. For the methanolic and aqueous extracts, the LD50 values were 575 and 646 mg/kg/d for males and 676 and 708 mg/kg/d for females, respectively. While an LD90 of 776 mg/kg/d was calculated for MEAGR in males, no LD90 values were recorded for aqueous extract in either sex. Organs of dead rats were removed and examined for gross lesions. Histopathological examination confirmed the toxicity of the plant by pathological changes observed in the kidneys, liver, lungs, and small intestine, where hemorrhage and congestion were observed in the liver, kidneys, and lungs in all the subjects, also intestinal enteritis was present. In the light of the results obtained in the field test, the AGRP has proved its effectiveness in a significant reduction of rodent’s population in comparison with the chemical rodenticides. Powder of A. gummifera rhizome may be a good alternative to chemical rodenticides.
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Article Type: Original Research | Subject: Biocontrol of Plant Diseases
Received: 2020/05/27 | Accepted: 2020/10/15 | Published: 2020/11/26

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